Blog Post/ Pantry

Vegan Substitutes for Eggs and Dairy

The biggest challenge when I was new to veganism was to find accessible substitutes for dairy and eggs in my favorite recipes. Honestly, I tried almost all of them. However, I had some challenges regarding specific recipes, such as Tiramisu, whipped cream, or cheesecake. It was a process of trial and error until I found my favorite substitutes, which I now use in my vegan cooking and baking.

Also, depending on where you live, it can be challenging to find vegan products or specific ingredients, especially for people that live in rural areas, as we did a few years ago. Although it is much easier nowadays than back then, most grocery stores carry a selection of processed vegan items.

Aquafaba is a great substitute for egg whites

After a few years of experimenting with ingredients, I am still learning and discovering new combinations. I have my favorites for baking and different ones for cooking. I replace eggs differently in baking than I would in cooking. Once you start experimenting with different substitutes, you will develop your own favorites list and learn about the pros and cons of certain subs in recipes. For example, organic additive-free soy milk is one of my favorites in baking. It delivers excellent results, especially when it comes to my Moroccan cookie recipes that call for eggs. Agar Agar is another one that I always liked for puddings and other recipes that need jelly.

Basbousa and cookies made with egg and butter substitutes

Feel free to share your favorite substitutes in the comments! These are my handy pantry subs for eggs and dairy:

Dairy

Milk, 1 cup        

Butter, 1 Stick  

Eggs, 1                

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Buttermilk, 1 cup

Yogurt, 1 cup

Cream cheese, 1 cup

.

Parmesan cheese

.

Whipping cream, 1 cup

Butter Ghee, 1 cup

.

Gelatin

Vegan Substitutes

1 cup of any plant-based milk

Vegan butter 1 stick, 7 tbsp of firm coconut oil or vegetable shortening

3 tbsp of water mixed with 1 tbsp of ground flax seeds

3 tbsp of chickpea flour mixed with 3 tbsp of water

¼ cup unsweetened apple sauce

¼ cup of vegan yogurt

3 tbsp aquafaba

3 tbsp of water mixed with 3 tbsp of chickpea flour

Silken or pureed tofu

egg substitute powders

½ tbsp of oil, 1 ½ tbsp of water, 1 teaspoon of baking powder, mixed

1 tbsp chia seeds mixed with 3 tbsp of boiling water (let sit 5 min)

1 cup of plant-based milk mixed with 1 tbsp of lemon juice or apple cider vinegar

vegan yogurt, 1 cup buttermilk (see above)

1 cup of vegan cream cheese, pureed tofu, or silken tofu or soaked and processed cashews

1 cup of raw unsalted cashews, 2 tbsp of nutritional yeast, 1 tsp garlic and herbs powder, ½ tsp salt – place all ingredients into a blender and pulse until the desired consistency is reached

1 cup of coconut cream (not coconut milk!)     

½ cup of olive oil, ½ cup of coconut or avocado oil, blend with 1 tsp organic hemp seeds and a dash of turmeric

Agar Agar (plant-based equivalent derived from algae)

Apple sauce

Apple sauce is a fat-free replacement for eggs in baked goods. A ¼ cup of (unsweetened) apple sauce is the replacement for one egg. It adds moisture and flavor to your cookies, other baked goods and reduces the calorie content. Apple sauce is readily available in most grocery stores, has a long shelf life, and can be homemade quickly with just apples, a little water, or lemon juice. 

Aquafaba

Aquafaba means bean water and is the liquid in which chickpeas or beans have been soaked or cooked. It is a combination of protein, starches, and vegetable gum. It can be used as a vegan egg substitute since the proteins and starches are structurally very similar. To use aquafaba in vegan recipes, substitute 1 tablespoon of aquafaba for 1 egg yolk, 2 tablespoons of aquafaba for 1 egg white, and 3 tablespoons of aquafaba for a whole egg.

You can use aquafaba from canned beans or chickpeas or make your own at home by cooking dried (soaked!) chickpeas or beans and straining the liquid.

Chickpea flour

Chickpea flour is high in protein, has many vitamins and minerals, and is a perfect egg replacer that works great as a binder in baking and cooking. For one egg, mix 3 tablespoons of water or non-dairy milk and 3 tablespoons of chickpea flour until combined into a thick and creamy paste. Chickpea flour is available in some grocery stores or online. However, I would not recommend using it in raw dough recipes as it has a slightly strong taste when eaten uncooked.

Egg substitute powders

There are options for egg substitute powders in many grocery stores or online. They are usually made of starches, flours, and baking powder. Several options for egg substitute powders can be found in most grocery stores. However, with a long shelf-life, they are good to have in your pantry for baked goods and savory recipes that require an egg-like binder, such as vegan meat loaves, patties, and other dishes.

Flaxseed

Ground flaxseed is a nutritious seed full of omega-3 fatty acids. ALA is one of my favorite egg replacement options in baking and cooking. One tablespoon of ground flaxseed stirred into 3 tablespoons of water, given 5 minutes to thicken up, is the classic replacement for one egg. I use organic additive-free soy milk instead of water and a tsp of apple cider vinegar or lemon juice. This has always given me great results in baking and cooking.

Silken tofu & firm tofu

Tofu is full of protein and, therefore, also perfect as an egg replacement. Silken tofu has a soft and creamy texture. It works well in creamy foods, such as sour cream, homemade cream cheese replacements, or cheesecakes. Firm tofu is an excellent option for savory dishes, like vegan scrambled egg, vegan egg salad, quiches, savory muffins, and more. To replace one egg, use a one-quarter cup of silken or regular tofu. Here is a recipe for vegan German egg salad. And here you can find an easy recipe for a vegan scramble with black salt / Kala Namak.

Black salt (kala namak)

Black salt / Kala Namak, also known as Himalayan black salt, has volcanic origins and comes from the salt mines of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, and other Himalayan places. It was first used in Ayurvedic medicine and is now a common ingredient in cooking and popular in Indian recipes. Black salt has a smell and taste similar to eggs, which comes from the high content of sulfur. It is a very popular ingredient in vegan cooking for savory recipes that mimics egg dishes.

Tapioca starch

Tapioca starch is extracted from the tapioca root. It is similar to that of corn, potato, and other starches. Tapioca starch is a binding or thickening agent for sauces, puddings, and condiments. One tablespoon of tapioca starch, blended with 3 teaspoons of water, make a replacement for one egg.

The biggest challenge when I was new to veganism was finding accessible substitutes for dairy and eggs in my favorite recipes. Honestly, I tried almost all of them. However, I had some challenges regarding specific recipes, such as Tiramisu, whipped cream, or cheesecake. It was a process of trial and error until I found my favorite substitutes, which I now use in my vegan cooking and baking.

Also, depending on where you live, it can be challenging to find vegan products or specific ingredients, especially for people that live in rural areas, as we did a few years ago.

Although it is much easier nowadays than back then, most grocery stores carry a selection of processed vegan items.

After a few years of experimenting with ingredients, I am still learning and discovering new combinations.

I have my favorites for baking and different ones for cooking. I replace eggs differently in baking than I would in cooking. Once you start experimenting with different substitutes, you will develop your own favorites list and learn about the pros and cons of certain subs in recipes. For example, organic additive-free soy milk is one of my favorites in baking. It delivers excellent results, especially when it comes to my Moroccan cookie recipes that call for eggs. Agar Agar is another one that I always liked for puddings and other recipes that need jelly.

Never Miss a Recipe!

You Might Also Like

No Comments

Leave a Reply